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COVID19 pandemic is the first and hopefully the last that most of the people in the world now have ever lived through.

This is definitely causing a lot of fear and anxiety around the globe.

This also means that everyone is looking at the media to find out what is really happening and to fully understand coronavirus and its impact to the world.

We are however living in a time of social media where everybody, press or not can put out their news to the world be it true or false news. That’s why the media has to step up in ensuring that they can be trusted to report on coronavirus in a way that breeds education and unity.

Media platforms are being used to educate the masses on what coronavirus is and how it can be prevented. This has been done by showcasing health PSA’s on how to wash our hands, wear masks as well as busting myths on the virus that can cause discrimination of people or panic.

In Kenya, the thing that is required most by the citizens is for the media houses to offer transparency.

Transparency on how the government is handling COVID19 funds, how this pandemic has affected our economy and a glimpse of hope on how the future for Kenya looks like.

Citizens are looking to the media to provide data and accurate information on COVID19 victims, the conditions for those whom are in quarantine and most importantly to show Kenyans where the tests are being done.

These seem to be missing information in the media living citizens in the dark.

Kenya is known for its corruption that citizens have had to live through for decades. The media is in turn responsible for highlighting any form of corruption happening during this pandemic.

Are the police officers taking bribes to allow movement during lockdown? Are the police harassing citizens?

The media as essential workers play a huge role and are responsible for causing a great impact on how the world handles and fights COVID19.

By Esther Masaa

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